Archived Theses

2021

  • An Interface for Interactive Exploration of Communities on Social Media
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Maximilian Spiekermann, Supervisor: Jan Wolff
    The role social platforms play when it comes to radicalization on the internet is a hot topic. Increasingly segregated sub-communities ("filter bubbles") serve to reinforce fringe opinions and don't allow for healthy exposure to sentiments expressed elsewhere. Existing work has already been done to identify such bubbles within the social graph of Twitter. The goal of this thesis is to design an interface that enables an interactive exploration of this graph, with a focus on social bubbles and their interconnections. This includes researching methods to map and present the data and to consider which additional information could be displayed. Furthermore, a user study will have to be conducted to evaluate the design's expressiveness and intelligibility.
  • Preventing Selective Exposure on Twitter via Nudging
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Kerim Balci, Supervisor: Jan Wolff
    The content provided to users of social platforms is pre-filtered based on past behaviour on the platform. It is subject to selection biases of individual users, thus preventing any confrontation with divergent opinions. This thesis concerns with the design of an interface that makes users aware of overly selective exposure in their social feeds. The aim of this interface is to subtly steer users towards a broader exposure via nudging. Said design nudge should incentivize users to counteract increasing disconnection of sub-communities on social platforms. Furthermore, a user study is to provide insight into the acceptance of such a feature and the agreement with its feedback.
  • Comparison and Evaluation of Public and Private Output Modalities on the Earlobe
    Master Thesis, Student: Kerem Can Demir, Supervisors: Dennis Stanke and Tim Dünte
    This thesis should investigate the earlobe as a location to provide feedback to a user, e.g. when a notification arrives. Designing different earclip prototypes to provide different feedback modalities is a part of the thesis as well as the evaluation if the provided feedback is suitable for earclips. As an additional feedback technology besides standard technologies, like e.g. vibration, electrotactile feedback should be presented on the earlobe. A user study should evaluate the feedback methods in direct comparison and should analyze the acceptance of the user. Further usage scenarios or application demos have to be developed and evaluated. The thesis should try to answer the following questions: Which criteria are important for users if feedback ist presented at the earlobe? Which feedback technology do user prefer? Is there a significant difference in reaction time in a distraction task?
  • Augmentation of Headphones by Wearable Displays -- Design and Usage Scenarios
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Pia Brandt, Supervisor: Dennis Stanke
    Headphones allow defining your own soundscape and privately listening to audio sources in public. Active noise-cancelling headphones can even reduce external sounds that intrude into this soundscape. However, to others, the state of a person wearing headphones is unclear (is s/he listening to music? may s/he be spoken to?), which is socially problematic. The goal of this thesis is to explore whether displays integrated in headphones may help to communicate the state of the user to other people. What should be depicted on the display to indicate the state? What about privacy concerns? How should the headphones sense the state of the user? How could the user explicitly provide the content to be shown? This thesis comprises brainstorming about scenarios, sketching and designing potential visualizations on earpieces, asking potential users about the prospect of such display-enhanced headphones, and (if done as a Master's thesis) implementing a prototype.
  • Design and Evaluation of a Trackball as an Input Device for Smartwatches
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Peer Schroth, Supervisor: Dennis Stanke
    The fact that the finger covers the screen during touch input and the user can no longer see the screen content is still a problem when using smartwatches. Many smartwatches have alternative input possibilities to the touchscreen to prevent this problem. These include the rotation of the crown or bezel to interact without covering the screen with the users finger. This thesis will analyze already implemented interaction techniques and extend them by using a trackball as input device. Therefore, a trackball crown should be created for an Android smartwatch. Focus of this thesis is also the evaluation of a trackball as input device for smartwatches and the analysis of the user acceptance in user studies.

2020

2019

  • Implementation and Usability Evaluation of a Real-Time Insect Monitoring System
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Jakob Hederich, Supervisor: Kin-Woon Yeow, Submitted: May 2020
    In this project a pest monitoring system will be implemented using a Raspberry Pi, some LEDs and an IDS camera. The monitoring device is used to attract insects using light frequency of the LEDs and to monitor them using a camera. The insects will be detected using the You Only Look Once (YOLO) algorithm and further classified using Support Vector Machine(SVM). Two insect species (Aphids and Thrips) are identified with the method mentioned and the classification is done into three classes (Class 1: Aphids, Class 2: Thrips, Class 3: Others). The system will provide feedback to the user via an Android application. The real-time insect population will be recorded and displayed in a graphical form in the Android application. Furthermore, in the Android application, the user is able to set the type and frequency of the notification, either notifications in regular interval (daily or weekly basis) or warnings when a certain threshold is reached. The threshold mentioned is a population value that is either predetermined via experimental executions (eg. 80% of the maximum population) or inserted the threshold manually from the user. The setup feasibility of the monitoring system and the procedural execution in Android application are investigated in the user study. A simulated garden environment is conducted to ensure the users are able to use the system in a correct manner. Before the execution of the user study, a user manual for the monitoring system will be written for the user understanding. In the end of this thesis, an analysis/ a data tabulation that consists of usability and user-friendliness will be included from the survey conducted.
  • A Mobile Vision-Based Recognition System
    Master Thesis, Student: Zhengyuan Miao, Supervisor: Kin-Woon Yeow, Submitted: May 2020
    An Android application will be developed for amount-counting task of the pests in green house for this project. The whole system consists of two parts - mobile device with application and the server. User can use the application to take photos for the leaves of the vegetables and then these photos will be sent to the server for image recognition and object detection so that the number of pests will be automatically counted. By the server side, an image recognition algorithm will be run to calculate the number of the pests (and also with classifications of the pest types), after calculating server will send the results back to the user side and user can easily get the total quantities of different pests. Based on the result numbers user can take actions if the value of the pests’ quantity is beyond the threshold to protect the crops. Furthermore, we can see the data in server via ssh in the computer to analyze the data for experiment or somewhat. At the end of the project, a user study will be conducted, before the user study one user manual is required to be written and then user can read the manual to understand how to use the application.
  • Combining a Neural Network with Scene Recognition to Provide Mobile Audio Guidance for the Blind
    Master Thesis, Student: Kersten Behrens, Supervisor: Oliver Beren Kaul, Submitted: May 2020
  • Exploration of Control Loop Strategies for EMS Applications using Neural Networks
    Master Thesis, Student: Stefan Schmidt, Supervisor: Tim Dünte, Submitted: July 2020
    Electrical Muscle Stimulation (EMS) is being researched in many different applications in the field of human-computer interaction, such as learning to play an instrument. Current problems refer to a only rough control of the muscles. Therefore, a solution strategy using neural networks is examined here. The research question is: How well are neural networks suitable for controlling an EMS application? To answer this question, the basic problems of EMS are first analyzed. Thereby an approach is presented which is based on the combination of Reinforcement Learning with neural networks. Experiments show that Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) are superior to feedforward networks. Analyses show significant differences in controlling of different angles. Therefore, comparisons between controllers for individual angles must be made. A comparison of PID controller and RNN shows an average increase in precision of 4.17°, in favor of the RNN. A comparison between PID controller and Bidirectional Recurrent Neural Network (BiRNN) shows an average increase of 7.63°. A comparison between RNN and BiRNN shows an increase of 3.46° by the BiRNN.
  • Evaluation of Eletrotactile Feedback for Everyday Usage Scenarios
    Master Thesis, Student: Justin Schulte, Supervisor: Tim Dünte, Submitted: June 2020
    Nowadays, most people own at least one smartphone and at the same time smartwatches and other wearables are becoming more and more popular. These devices send a variety of notifications to the wearer, usually in the form of vibration, sound or a status LED. Further, many users prefer invisible feedback, so that only the attention of the addressee and no third party is attracted. Accordingly, vibration feedback is used to a large extent, but this feedback is not sufficiently distinguishable. In this thesis, a wristwatch for mobile use is designed to evaluate an alternative invisible notification method using electrotactile feedback. By adjusting the parameters of the electro-tactile feedback the creation of different sensations is investigated. Potentially distinguishable natural notifications such as vibrating, itching or prodding are generated. A wristwatch prototype with corrosion-resistant gold-plated electrodes was designed, which were produced in a new electrode manufacturing process. Furthermore, a calibration procedure is presented to determine the individual strengths of the different electro-tactile stimulations. The time required for this process could be reduced to about one third of the time needed for a previous work. When calibrating a certain stimulation, it had to be played 3.2 times on average instead of 11.1 times. In the first study, the 17 participants were asked to assign terms, which correspond to one sensation each, to different stimulations. The stimulation associated with Prodding was best recognized (87 %). Furthermore, the majority of the participants would also use the stimulations Vibrating, Jabbing, Prodding and Pulsating in everyday life. In total, 76 % of the participants would use the designed system in everyday life. The second study, which included a distraction task, was planned but only conducted on one expert user. An average detection rate of 88 % was achieved. This result cannot be generalized, but shows the potential of the feedback method.
  • A Survey of Context Awareness for Wearables
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Daniela Wilhelm, Supervisor: Dennis Stanke, Submitted: March 2020
    The aim of this thesis is to provide an overview of recent research on Context-Awareness. Therefore, previous research dealing with conceptual modelling and practical implementation should be elaborated. In addition, the limits of context awareness in current applications should be shown. This work is suited for students who are interested in current research and not in a technical implementation. Good English skills and a high degree of self-motivation are highly recommended to explore the original English articles in detail.
  • Measuring Bicycle Lanes
    Master Thesis, Student: Timon Breßgott, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel, Submitted: April 2020
  • Interaction Techniques for Magnetic Pointing Devices on Smartwatches
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Steffen Ryll, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel, Submitted: March 2020
  • Easy Walking: Pedestrian Navigation Depending on Weather Conditions
    Master Thesis, Student: Markus Krömker, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel, Submitted: May 2020
  • Digitizing Notes with Eye Tracking and World Cameras
    Master Thesis, Student: Jiang Xuan, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel, Submitted: May 2020
  • The Influence of Notifications on Activities
    Master Thesis, Student: Miguel Escobar Rojas, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel, Submitted: November 2019
  • A Survey of Recent Advances in Tactile Feedback
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Moritz Hasemann, Supervisor: Oliver Beren Kaul, Submitted: September 2019
    The purpose of this thesis is a literature review of current research and recent advances in tactile feedback, its biological background, sensations, actuators, and use cases. The review should provide a broad background of related work and is suited for students who wish to work on a bachelor thesis which is more research-oriented and less technical. This thesis is primarily suitable for students with strong English skills and a high degree of self-motivation to explore the subject in detail, because it involves reading and reporting about original articles written in English.
  • A Survey of Recent Advances in Audio Classification
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Tim-Marek Thomas, Supervisor: Oliver Beren Kaul, Submitted: September 2019
    A literature review of current research and recent advances in audio event (speech sounds and natural sounds) classification using a variety of different artificial intelligence approaches and their use cases is the purpose of this thesis. The review should provide a broad background of related work and is suited for students who wish to work on a bachelor thesis which is more research-oriented and less technical. This thesis is primarily suitable for students with strong English skills and a high degree of self-motivation to explore the subject in detail, because it involves reading and reporting about original articles written in English.
  • Development of a Virtual Reality User Interface supporting the Drafting of Vibrotactile Patterns for a Head-worn Output Device
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Andreas Domin, Supervisor: Oliver Beren Kaul, Submitted: August 2019

2018

  • Designing and Implementing an Augmented Reality Application for a Shape-Changing Display
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Mateusz Ryzewski, Supervisor: Tim Dünte
  • Design of a natural leve-based Interaction Method for EMG and EMS based Notifications
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Niklas Rosenbusch, Supervisor: Tim Dünte
  • Design of Multi Channel EMS Notifications and their Effects on the User Experience
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Mu'aid Mughrabi, Supervisor: Tim Dünte, Submitted: January 2019
  • Evaluation of the Expressivity of EMS Patterns
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Kendall Ly, Supervisor: Tim Dünte
  • Electrotactile Feedback as a Notification Method for interactive Wearables
    Master Thesis, Student: Dennis Stanke, Supervisor: Tim Dünte, Submitted: June 2019
  • AR Search for bookshelves
    Master Thesis, Student: Thilo Schulz, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel
  • Comparison of External and Internal Sensor Data of Digital Pens for Gesture Input
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Polina Geisler, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel
  • Measuring the world: Make electronic devices smart!
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Laurent Skiba, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel
  • Effects of the Phantom Sensation on 3D Tactile Guidance around the Head
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Kerem Can Demir, Supervisor: Oliver Beren Kaul
  • Extraction of Immersive Tactile Effects from the Sound of Movies for a Head-Based Output Interface
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Jonas Fabiasik, Supervisor: Oliver Beren Kaul
  • Implementation and Evaluation of a Silent Head-Mounted Tactile Interface
    Master Thesis, Student: Jonas Bock, Supervisor: Oliver Beren Kaul
  • Development of a User Interface for Designing Vibrotactile Patterns for a Head-Mounted Output Device
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Leonard Hansing, Supervisor: Oliver Beren Kaul
  • Visualization Framework for Motion Sensors
    Master Thesis, Student: Ferdinand Lange, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel
  • Spectrophone: A novel apporach for surface classification with smartphones
    Master Thesis, Student: Philipp Etgeton, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel
  • Active Navigation
    Master Thesis, Student: Peter Brandes, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel
  • Position Detection of an Electrode Grid via EMG Raw Data
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Patrick Sachmann, Supervisor: Tim Dünte

2017

  • Extending and Testing the PostFix IDE
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Marcel Budoj, Supervisor: Michael Rohs, Submitted: March 2018
  • EMG-Based Hand and Finger Gesture Recognition with a Multi Electrode Grid
    Master Thesis, Student: Christian Dirkes, Supervisor: Tim Dünte
  • Design and Evaluation of various EMG Sensors for Electrode Grids
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Hendrik Frei, Supervisor: Tim Dünte
  • Design and Evaluation of a wearable Device for the visual Representation of physical Exertion in Sport Groups
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Felix Trommer, Supervisor: Tim Dünte
  • Design of a Casual Interaction Method for Notifications using EMS and EMG
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Gerrit Rode, Supervisor: Tim Dünte
  • Ambient Notifications for a Shape-Changing Display
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Christian Althaus, Supervisor: Tim Dünte
  • Spatial Patterns for a Head-Worn Vibrotactile Display
    Master Thesis, Student: Marc Mogalle, Supervisor: Oliver Beren Kaul
  • Improving VR Presence using Head-Based Vibrotactile Feedback and Hand Tracking
    Master Thesis, Student: Bastian Krefeld, Supervisor: Oliver Beren Kaul
  • Real-Time Navigation of Visually Impaired Users via a Self-Positioning Device and Vibrotactile Feedback
    Master Thesis, Student: Guido Gardlo, Supervisor: Oliver Beren Kaul
  • Application Scenarios for Smartwatch Interactions with Distance Sensors
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Lars Hamann, Supervisor: Michael Rohs
  • Curved Treemaps
    Master Thesis, Student: Christian Brosy, Supervisor: Michael Rohs
  • Design, Implementation, and Analysis of an IDE for a Beginner's Programming Language
    Master Thesis, Student: Björn Fiedler, Supervisor: Michael Rohs
  • Using pen movement and audio data to verify signatures
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Lukas Nagel, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel
  • Deep learning for handwriting recognition based on multi sensor data from pens
    Master Thesis, Student: Max-Ludwig Stadler, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel
  • Usage of eye tracking depth information for interaction with objects in virtual reality
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Jannik Dahlke, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel
  • Implicit calibration of three dimensional eyetracking gaze points based on moving objects in virtual reality
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Tim Cofala, Supervisor: Maximilian Schrapel
  • Electromyography-Based Acknowledgement of Haptic Notifications
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Justin Schulte, Supervisor: Tim Dünte
  • EMG-Based Hand Gesture Recognition with a Multi Electrode Grid
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Josef Kriegel, Supervisor: Tim Dünte
  • Position Detection of an Electrode Grids on the Forearm via EMG
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Malte Lucius, Supervisor: Tim Dünte

2016

  • Indoor Navigation with Smartwatches
    Master Thesis, Student: Linh Phan, Supervisor: Michael Rohs
  • Smartwatch Posture Tracking
    Master Thesis, Student: Christian Domin, Supervisor: Michael Rohs
  • Rapid Serial Visual Presentation on the Go
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Tim Rouven Hamp, Supervisor: Michael Rohs
  • Analysis and Modeling of Interactive Devices
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Daphne Schössow, Supervisor: Michael Rohs
  • Conception and Implementation of a System for Obstacle Avoidance in Pedestrian Navigation with Electrical Muscle Stimulation
    Master Thesis, Student: Sven Lilge, Supervisors: Max Pfeiffer and Steffen Busch
  • A Self-Calibrating Wearable Electrode Grid for Controlling Hand Gestures via EMS
    Master Thesis, Student: Tim Dünte, Supervisor: Max Pfeiffer
  • A Shape-Changing Display for Ambient Notifications
    Master Thesis, Student: Andre Lehnert, Supervisor: Max Pfeiffer
  • Design of a Tool for Analyzing and Modeling Interactive Devices
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: André Kamrad, Supervisor: Michael Rohs
  • Competitive Emoji Response Game
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Marco Deneke, Supervisor: Henning Pohl
  • Casual Interaction with a Smartwatch
    Master Thesis, Student: Sven Röttering, Supervisor: Henning Pohl
  • Reactive Compression Feedback
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Peter Brandes, Supervisor: Henning Pohl
  • Compression Feedback for Notifications
    Master Thesis, Student: Hung Ngo Quang, Supervisor: Henning Pohl
  • An Ambient Multi-Scale Information Object
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Sezer Dursun, Supervisor: Henning Pohl
  • Evaluation of a Vibrotactile Guidance and Immersion Display on the Head
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Kevin Meier, Supervisor: Oliver Beren Kaul

2015

  • A Context-Based Approach to a Proactive Launcher for Mobile Devices
    Master Thesis, Student: Andreas Möhring, Supervisor: Michael Rohs
  • Plagiarism Detection in Student Programming Assignments
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Christian Domin, Supervisor: Markus Krause
  • Motivationsverstärkung bei Studenten in Onlinekursen durch Gamification
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Marc Mogalle, Supervisor: Markus Krause
  • Simulation von Texturen mit EMS-basiertem haptischem Feedback für interaktive Oberflächen
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Le Duy Linh Phan, Supervisor: Max Pfeiffer
  • A Mobile Feedback and Microlearning System for University courses
    Master Thesis, Student: Marcus Wobig, Supervisor: Michael Rohs
  • Supporting audiometric testing for children through a computer game
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Marco Herbst, Supervisor:
  • Digital Games for Voice Taining
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Kevin Raetz, Supervisor: Markus Krause
  • Entwurf und Analyse einer interaktiven Visualisierung für planare Graphen höherer Ordnung
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Thiemo Fischer, Supervisor: Michael Rohs
  • Haptisches Feedback in 3D Interaktionen- Simulation von Objekteigenschaften mittels EMS
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Martin Buntrock, Supervisor: Max Pfeiffer
  • Pedestrian Navigation – Controlling Walking Direction using EMS
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Peter Denis, Supervisor: Max Pfeiffer
  • Haptic Feedback in 3D Interaction – Simulating Object Properties Using EMS
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Wei Chen, Supervisor: Max Pfeiffer, Submitted: January 2016
  • Universal Haptic Touch – Simulating Haptic Touch Feedback on Large, Small, and Mobile Touch Devices
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Eike Schlicht, Supervisor: Max Pfeiffer
  • Biofeedback for User Evaluation – Collecting and Analyzing Data of an Arduino-Based Low-Cost Biofeedack System
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Björn Fiedler, Supervisor: Max Pfeiffer
  • A Zooming Emoji Keyboard
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Dennis Stanke, Supervisor: Henning Pohl
  • Categorical Emoji Keyboard
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Philipp Seelig, Supervisor: Henning Pohl
  • Eye-Tracking for Casual Interaction with a Phone
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Christoph Lenz, Supervisor: Henning Pohl
  • Compression Feedback Gaming
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Franziska Hoheisel, Supervisor: Henning Pohl
  • Casual Output for Smartwatches
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Justyna Medrek, Supervisor: Henning Pohl

2014

  • Design and Implementation of a Wearable Prototype for EMS-Based Pedestrian Navigation
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Tim Dünte, Supervisor: Max Pfeiffer
  • Semantic Similarity - Comparing Crowdworkers with Experts
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Nils Batram, Supervisor: Markus Krause
  • Simulation von haptischem Feedback in 3D Interaktionen: Unterscheidung von Objektgrössen durch EMS
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Gil Engel, Supervisor: Max Pfeiffer
  • Haptic Feedback for Mobile Augmented Reality Interactions with Physical Objects
    Master Thesis, Student: Oliver Beren Kaul, Supervisor: Max Pfeiffer
  • Multi-Scale Around-Device Output
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Bastian Krefeld, Supervisor: Henning Pohl
  • Casual Interaction with a Bracelet
    Master Thesis, Student: Karoline Busse, Supervisor: Henning Pohl
  • Thumb Input for Tablet Computers
    Bachelor Thesis, Student: Tim Dannhauer, Supervisor: Michael Rohs
  • Multi-Touch Text Entry for Mobile Devices
    Master Thesis, Student: Minh Anh Truong, Supervisor: Michael Rohs
  • Comparison of Object-Oriented and Functional Programming for GUI Development
    Master Thesis, Student: Eugen Kiss, Supervisor: Michael Rohs

2013